This unique piece of art was created to go on the top of a calendar. Space in the center has been provided for the year. The 38 horses in this artwork, drawn with black pen, has the unusual dimensions of 23 by 6 inches. (SOLD)

This small, fanciful piece of art is rendered in gouache with an array of colors that blends realism and abstract styles. The image measures 5 by 7 inches and it is contained inside a mat board. Price: (SOLD).

This interesting back view of a cowboy with a rope in hand ready to lasso a calf was an illustration for a 1967 magazine ad for Wrangler jeans. This detailed pencil drawing on paper measures 8 by 13 inches. (SOLD)

A staple of Sam Savitt artwork were his drawings of mares and foals. This particular drawing was the last draft before the finalization of a drawing that was reproduced by the thousands in the 1970’s. This small, graceful pencil drawing measures 10 by 12 inches. It is produced on light-weight paper and does not have a mat.

This simple watercolor is a snapshot image that captures a typically western scene. This artwork measures 4 by 8 inches. It is held in a plain white mat board for its protection. (SOLD)

Thoroughbred sketch 2

This sketch in charcoal pencil was drawn on-site at a thoroughbred horse breeding farm in Maryland in 1965. Sam Savitt often preferred these quick sketches over photography when preparing for a future drawing or painting. This drawing on medium-stock paper measures 13 by 17 inches — the dimensions of his sketch pad.

This sketch in charcoal pencil was drawn on-site at a thoroughbred horse breeding farm in Maryland in 1965. Sam Savitt often preferred these quick sketches over photography when preparing for a future drawing or painting. This drawing on medium-stock paper measures 13 by 17 inches — the dimensions of his sketch pad.

Completed during the last decade of his life, Sam Savitt depicts the inherent loneliness of the Pony Express rider in this expansive oil painting (42 by 30 inches). While the Pony Express mail delivery service lasted only 18 months (1860-61), it is ingrained in the lore of the American West and represents the country’s first transcontinental communications system. This is the largest piece of artwork in our collection. (SOLD)

On the day the Kentucky Horse Park opened in 1978, Sam Savitt completed this picture of a statue at the park’s grounds commemorating Man O-War, one of the greatest racehorses of all time. This mixed-media piece, which blends pencil and watercolor, measures 11 by 15 inches. (sold).

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